5 Secrets for Getting the Best Last-Minute Travel Deals

Summer is slipping away, and if you’re feeling the heat but think you’ve missed the boat on vacationing, the consumer editors at Reader’s Digest say it’s not too late to find a bargain.

Granted, the best deals on air travel and some vacation packages are offered months in advance. But Digest editors wrested a few cool tips from Toronto-based travel agent Brian Simpson on getting the best deals on last-minute travel:

Don’t confuse “last-minute” with “short notice.” Last-minute travel is generally accepted to mean short-notice travel, taking place within about 14 days from when you booked. However, short-notice travel means you show up at the airport and buy your ticket, as in many a rom-com movie. This method will cost you an arm and a leg, but savings of 30 to 50 percent are fairly easy to find if you can book two weeks before you pack.

Airfare deals need the most sleuthing. The best last-minute deals are often found in package deals, which include the airfare. Last-minute deals on airfare alone are rare, although tour operators needing to fill a charter flight will sometimes offer really low prices, so that’s the place to start looking if you’re looking for late-date airfare.

Mid-week travel is best. Traveling on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday can save you big bucks no matter how far ahead you book. For last-minute travel, it’s crucial, so plan a Wednesday to Wednesday vacation if you can.

Be savvy about last-minute hotel deals. The best path for late-date hotel deals may be with Priceline, where you can name your price. Hotels like it because it helps them to fill empty rooms. But you won’t know which hotel has “won” your business until you’ve accepted the deal, so it may not be the best choice if you are really choosy.

Last-minute travel is best for adventurers. You’ll find the best deals if you are willing to take a bit of potluck about destination. The search may be less successful if you’re stuck on one place and have no flexibility on vacation dates.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post 5 Secrets for Getting the Best Last-Minute Travel Deals appeared first on RISMedia.

      

5 Secrets for Getting the Best Last-Minute Travel Deals

Summer is slipping away, and if you’re feeling the heat but think you’ve missed the boat on vacationing, the consumer editors at Reader’s Digest say it’s not too late to find a bargain.

Granted, the best deals on air travel and some vacation packages are offered months in advance. But Digest editors wrested a few cool tips from Toronto-based travel agent Brian Simpson on getting the best deals on last-minute travel:

Don’t confuse “last-minute” with “short notice.” Last-minute travel is generally accepted to mean short-notice travel, taking place within about 14 days from when you booked. However, short-notice travel means you show up at the airport and buy your ticket, as in many a rom-com movie. This method will cost you an arm and a leg, but savings of 30 to 50 percent are fairly easy to find if you can book two weeks before you pack.

Airfare deals need the most sleuthing. The best last-minute deals are often found in package deals, which include the airfare. Last-minute deals on airfare alone are rare, although tour operators needing to fill a charter flight will sometimes offer really low prices, so that’s the place to start looking if you’re looking for late-date airfare.

Mid-week travel is best. Traveling on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday can save you big bucks no matter how far ahead you book. For last-minute travel, it’s crucial, so plan a Wednesday to Wednesday vacation if you can.

Be savvy about last-minute hotel deals. The best path for late-date hotel deals may be with Priceline, where you can name your price. Hotels like it because it helps them to fill empty rooms. But you won’t know which hotel has “won” your business until you’ve accepted the deal, so it may not be the best choice if you are really choosy.

Last-minute travel is best for adventurers. You’ll find the best deals if you are willing to take a bit of potluck about destination. The search may be less successful if you’re stuck on one place and have no flexibility on vacation dates.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post 5 Secrets for Getting the Best Last-Minute Travel Deals appeared first on RISMedia.

      

5 Secrets for Getting the Best Last-Minute Travel Deals

Summer is slipping away, and if you’re feeling the heat but think you’ve missed the boat on vacationing, the consumer editors at Reader’s Digest say it’s not too late to find a bargain.

Granted, the best deals on air travel and some vacation packages are offered months in advance. But Digest editors wrested a few cool tips from Toronto-based travel agent Brian Simpson on getting the best deals on last-minute travel:

Don’t confuse “last-minute” with “short notice.” Last-minute travel is generally accepted to mean short-notice travel, taking place within about 14 days from when you booked. However, short-notice travel means you show up at the airport and buy your ticket, as in many a rom-com movie. This method will cost you an arm and a leg, but savings of 30 to 50 percent are fairly easy to find if you can book two weeks before you pack.

Airfare deals need the most sleuthing. The best last-minute deals are often found in package deals, which include the airfare. Last-minute deals on airfare alone are rare, although tour operators needing to fill a charter flight will sometimes offer really low prices, so that’s the place to start looking if you’re looking for late-date airfare.

Mid-week travel is best. Traveling on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday can save you big bucks no matter how far ahead you book. For last-minute travel, it’s crucial, so plan a Wednesday to Wednesday vacation if you can.

Be savvy about last-minute hotel deals. The best path for late-date hotel deals may be with Priceline, where you can name your price. Hotels like it because it helps them to fill empty rooms. But you won’t know which hotel has “won” your business until you’ve accepted the deal, so it may not be the best choice if you are really choosy.

Last-minute travel is best for adventurers. You’ll find the best deals if you are willing to take a bit of potluck about destination. The search may be less successful if you’re stuck on one place and have no flexibility on vacation dates.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post 5 Secrets for Getting the Best Last-Minute Travel Deals appeared first on RISMedia.

      

$136,000 :: 45536 BERKSHIRE, Update MI, 48044

2 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,450 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/11/18, Last Updated: 09/11/18
Property Type: Condo/Townhouse/Co-Op
MLS Number: 509131
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: HUNTCLIFF VILLAGE
Status: Sold

SUPER CLEAN END UNIT RANCH STYLE CONDO!!FINISHED BASEMENT W/ KITCHEN, REC AREA & LOTSOF STORAGE! OAK CABINETS IN KITCHENS & LAUNDRYROOM. CERAMIC IN FOYER, HALLS & 1ST FLOORLAUNDRY. BAY WINDOW IN LIVING ROOM! SPOTLESS!!!

Listed with Advantage Realty


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

$136,000 :: 45536 BERKSHIRE, Update MI, 48044

2 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,450 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/11/18, Last Updated: 09/11/18
Property Type: Condo/Townhouse/Co-Op
MLS Number: 509131
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: HUNTCLIFF VILLAGE
Status: Sold

SUPER CLEAN END UNIT RANCH STYLE CONDO!!FINISHED BASEMENT W/ KITCHEN, REC AREA & LOTSOF STORAGE! OAK CABINETS IN KITCHENS & LAUNDRYROOM. CERAMIC IN FOYER, HALLS & 1ST FLOORLAUNDRY. BAY WINDOW IN LIVING ROOM! SPOTLESS!!!

Listed with Advantage Realty


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

$136,000 :: 45536 BERKSHIRE, Update MI, 48044

2 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,450 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/11/18, Last Updated: 09/11/18
Property Type: Condo/Townhouse/Co-Op
MLS Number: 509131
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: HUNTCLIFF VILLAGE
Status: Sold

SUPER CLEAN END UNIT RANCH STYLE CONDO!!FINISHED BASEMENT W/ KITCHEN, REC AREA & LOTSOF STORAGE! OAK CABINETS IN KITCHENS & LAUNDRYROOM. CERAMIC IN FOYER, HALLS & 1ST FLOORLAUNDRY. BAY WINDOW IN LIVING ROOM! SPOTLESS!!!

Listed with Advantage Realty


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

What to Buy in September

(TNS)—September is a big month for bargains, with deep discounts on summer merchandise and more.

“September is all about the end of summer, so anything seasonal is going to be on clearance,” says Benjamin K. Glaser, former features editor with DealNews.com.

You’ll find the last of the one-cent and 10-cent deals on school supplies at the big office-supply chains in September. If you or the student in your life needs a laptop computer, you might find a bargain.

“Inventory will be more limited, but the discounts justify giving it a look,” Glaser says.

At the grocery store, summer produce is discounted and so is the first bounty of fall.

“You’ll see great prices on peaches and nectarines, alongside pears and apples,” says Chris Romano, chief operating officer of Veggie Noodle Co. in Austin, Texas, and former coordinator for produce and floral for Whole Foods Market. “You have two seasons at the same time.”

Here’s your guide to the best things to buy in September.

Tomatoes and Corn
If you’ve been enjoying big, juicy summer tomatoes, now is your last chance to enjoy them at lower prices.

In September, you can still find a rainbow of heirloom varieties for 20 to 50 percent less than out-of-season prices, Romano says.

Big, round “slicer” tomatoes—a cookout staple for topping burgers—will be cheaper, with some as low as 99 cents a pound. Don’t forget fresh corn—markets tend to roll out specials, such as 25 cents an ear, or four for $1.

September also ushers in the first tastes of fall. Hearty greens that are great in soups and salads, such as kale and chard, “need the cool, crisp nights” that September brings, Romano says. Look for big discounts.

Apples and Pears
Craving apple pie, apple fritters or just a sweet, crispy apple with a slice of cheese? Domestic apples are a fall crop, and as they roll into the stores in September, you’ll see prices start to drop, says Romano.

It’s also the start of the short season for another fall favorite: Bartlett pears.

“They’re very prolific and very flavorful in September and October,” says Romano. “You’ll see some nice discounts.”

Coffee
Make your calendars, caffeine fiends: Saturday, Sept. 29 is National Coffee Day. To celebrate, many coffee houses and doughnut shops, including chain stores and small independent cafes, will offer deals and discounts. Some coffee shops offer free cups of java and doughnuts on the house, as well as special buys on coffee beans.

One place you won’t find a free cup of joe: Starbucks. The giant coffee chain instead uses National Coffee Day to kick off charitable events and tout the positive impact it has on coffee-growing communities worldwide.

Airline Tickets
Most people take their big trips in summer, which makes September a good month to find deals on airline tickets. The one exception for fall travel bargains is Thanksgiving week. Flights sell quickly and at a premium for that holiday.

A few guidelines to follow:

  • If you see a good price, grab it. Airfares change frequently, and there’s always someone waiting to grab that ticket if you don’t.
  • The general rule for buying airline tickets is to book about 60 days in advance, so if you’re planning a winter getaway, September is a good time to nail it down.
  • To boost your chances of landing a deal, set fare alerts for your destination on sites such as Orbitz or Travelocity, or use a price prediction and monitoring app like Hopper. Google Flights is also a good resource for booking air travel, and it recently added new tools to help you decide the best time to book.

Bicycles, Gear and Accessories
Whether you’re an occasional bike rider or you take it seriously, September is a good month to buy a bicycle. New models debut in the fall, so retailers start to sell old inventory.

A lot of bike manufacturers have already delivered their 2019 models, says Larry Pennenski, manager of Mike’s Bikes, which sells the top bike brands at its two stores in Charleston, S.C.

Don’t expect huge discounts on bicycles.

“There’s not a whole lot of markup on them,” says Pennenski. Mike’s Bikes typically discounts older models by about 10 percent, he says.

Bike prices are all over the place, depending on what you want. A 10 percent discount on a $500 Electra Cruiser, for example, saves you a tidy $50. In September, also look for deals on cycling jerseys, helmets, storage stands, tools, and more.

Your location affects prices, too. In northern climes, the bike business slows down during cold months. That’s leverage for shoppers. Being a first-time customer at your local bike shop might give you negotiating power, too, since the store probably wants to build loyalty and retain you as a lifetime customer.

©2018 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post What to Buy in September appeared first on RISMedia.

      

What to Buy in September

(TNS)—September is a big month for bargains, with deep discounts on summer merchandise and more.

“September is all about the end of summer, so anything seasonal is going to be on clearance,” says Benjamin K. Glaser, former features editor with DealNews.com.

You’ll find the last of the one-cent and 10-cent deals on school supplies at the big office-supply chains in September. If you or the student in your life needs a laptop computer, you might find a bargain.

“Inventory will be more limited, but the discounts justify giving it a look,” Glaser says.

At the grocery store, summer produce is discounted and so is the first bounty of fall.

“You’ll see great prices on peaches and nectarines, alongside pears and apples,” says Chris Romano, chief operating officer of Veggie Noodle Co. in Austin, Texas, and former coordinator for produce and floral for Whole Foods Market. “You have two seasons at the same time.”

Here’s your guide to the best things to buy in September.

Tomatoes and Corn
If you’ve been enjoying big, juicy summer tomatoes, now is your last chance to enjoy them at lower prices.

In September, you can still find a rainbow of heirloom varieties for 20 to 50 percent less than out-of-season prices, Romano says.

Big, round “slicer” tomatoes—a cookout staple for topping burgers—will be cheaper, with some as low as 99 cents a pound. Don’t forget fresh corn—markets tend to roll out specials, such as 25 cents an ear, or four for $1.

September also ushers in the first tastes of fall. Hearty greens that are great in soups and salads, such as kale and chard, “need the cool, crisp nights” that September brings, Romano says. Look for big discounts.

Apples and Pears
Craving apple pie, apple fritters or just a sweet, crispy apple with a slice of cheese? Domestic apples are a fall crop, and as they roll into the stores in September, you’ll see prices start to drop, says Romano.

It’s also the start of the short season for another fall favorite: Bartlett pears.

“They’re very prolific and very flavorful in September and October,” says Romano. “You’ll see some nice discounts.”

Coffee
Make your calendars, caffeine fiends: Saturday, Sept. 29 is National Coffee Day. To celebrate, many coffee houses and doughnut shops, including chain stores and small independent cafes, will offer deals and discounts. Some coffee shops offer free cups of java and doughnuts on the house, as well as special buys on coffee beans.

One place you won’t find a free cup of joe: Starbucks. The giant coffee chain instead uses National Coffee Day to kick off charitable events and tout the positive impact it has on coffee-growing communities worldwide.

Airline Tickets
Most people take their big trips in summer, which makes September a good month to find deals on airline tickets. The one exception for fall travel bargains is Thanksgiving week. Flights sell quickly and at a premium for that holiday.

A few guidelines to follow:

  • If you see a good price, grab it. Airfares change frequently, and there’s always someone waiting to grab that ticket if you don’t.
  • The general rule for buying airline tickets is to book about 60 days in advance, so if you’re planning a winter getaway, September is a good time to nail it down.
  • To boost your chances of landing a deal, set fare alerts for your destination on sites such as Orbitz or Travelocity, or use a price prediction and monitoring app like Hopper. Google Flights is also a good resource for booking air travel, and it recently added new tools to help you decide the best time to book.

Bicycles, Gear and Accessories
Whether you’re an occasional bike rider or you take it seriously, September is a good month to buy a bicycle. New models debut in the fall, so retailers start to sell old inventory.

A lot of bike manufacturers have already delivered their 2019 models, says Larry Pennenski, manager of Mike’s Bikes, which sells the top bike brands at its two stores in Charleston, S.C.

Don’t expect huge discounts on bicycles.

“There’s not a whole lot of markup on them,” says Pennenski. Mike’s Bikes typically discounts older models by about 10 percent, he says.

Bike prices are all over the place, depending on what you want. A 10 percent discount on a $500 Electra Cruiser, for example, saves you a tidy $50. In September, also look for deals on cycling jerseys, helmets, storage stands, tools, and more.

Your location affects prices, too. In northern climes, the bike business slows down during cold months. That’s leverage for shoppers. Being a first-time customer at your local bike shop might give you negotiating power, too, since the store probably wants to build loyalty and retain you as a lifetime customer.

©2018 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post What to Buy in September appeared first on RISMedia.

      

What to Buy in September

(TNS)—September is a big month for bargains, with deep discounts on summer merchandise and more.

“September is all about the end of summer, so anything seasonal is going to be on clearance,” says Benjamin K. Glaser, former features editor with DealNews.com.

You’ll find the last of the one-cent and 10-cent deals on school supplies at the big office-supply chains in September. If you or the student in your life needs a laptop computer, you might find a bargain.

“Inventory will be more limited, but the discounts justify giving it a look,” Glaser says.

At the grocery store, summer produce is discounted and so is the first bounty of fall.

“You’ll see great prices on peaches and nectarines, alongside pears and apples,” says Chris Romano, chief operating officer of Veggie Noodle Co. in Austin, Texas, and former coordinator for produce and floral for Whole Foods Market. “You have two seasons at the same time.”

Here’s your guide to the best things to buy in September.

Tomatoes and Corn
If you’ve been enjoying big, juicy summer tomatoes, now is your last chance to enjoy them at lower prices.

In September, you can still find a rainbow of heirloom varieties for 20 to 50 percent less than out-of-season prices, Romano says.

Big, round “slicer” tomatoes—a cookout staple for topping burgers—will be cheaper, with some as low as 99 cents a pound. Don’t forget fresh corn—markets tend to roll out specials, such as 25 cents an ear, or four for $1.

September also ushers in the first tastes of fall. Hearty greens that are great in soups and salads, such as kale and chard, “need the cool, crisp nights” that September brings, Romano says. Look for big discounts.

Apples and Pears
Craving apple pie, apple fritters or just a sweet, crispy apple with a slice of cheese? Domestic apples are a fall crop, and as they roll into the stores in September, you’ll see prices start to drop, says Romano.

It’s also the start of the short season for another fall favorite: Bartlett pears.

“They’re very prolific and very flavorful in September and October,” says Romano. “You’ll see some nice discounts.”

Coffee
Make your calendars, caffeine fiends: Saturday, Sept. 29 is National Coffee Day. To celebrate, many coffee houses and doughnut shops, including chain stores and small independent cafes, will offer deals and discounts. Some coffee shops offer free cups of java and doughnuts on the house, as well as special buys on coffee beans.

One place you won’t find a free cup of joe: Starbucks. The giant coffee chain instead uses National Coffee Day to kick off charitable events and tout the positive impact it has on coffee-growing communities worldwide.

Airline Tickets
Most people take their big trips in summer, which makes September a good month to find deals on airline tickets. The one exception for fall travel bargains is Thanksgiving week. Flights sell quickly and at a premium for that holiday.

A few guidelines to follow:

  • If you see a good price, grab it. Airfares change frequently, and there’s always someone waiting to grab that ticket if you don’t.
  • The general rule for buying airline tickets is to book about 60 days in advance, so if you’re planning a winter getaway, September is a good time to nail it down.
  • To boost your chances of landing a deal, set fare alerts for your destination on sites such as Orbitz or Travelocity, or use a price prediction and monitoring app like Hopper. Google Flights is also a good resource for booking air travel, and it recently added new tools to help you decide the best time to book.

Bicycles, Gear and Accessories
Whether you’re an occasional bike rider or you take it seriously, September is a good month to buy a bicycle. New models debut in the fall, so retailers start to sell old inventory.

A lot of bike manufacturers have already delivered their 2019 models, says Larry Pennenski, manager of Mike’s Bikes, which sells the top bike brands at its two stores in Charleston, S.C.

Don’t expect huge discounts on bicycles.

“There’s not a whole lot of markup on them,” says Pennenski. Mike’s Bikes typically discounts older models by about 10 percent, he says.

Bike prices are all over the place, depending on what you want. A 10 percent discount on a $500 Electra Cruiser, for example, saves you a tidy $50. In September, also look for deals on cycling jerseys, helmets, storage stands, tools, and more.

Your location affects prices, too. In northern climes, the bike business slows down during cold months. That’s leverage for shoppers. Being a first-time customer at your local bike shop might give you negotiating power, too, since the store probably wants to build loyalty and retain you as a lifetime customer.

©2018 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post What to Buy in September appeared first on RISMedia.

      

How to Understand Home Staging Pricing and Proposals: Do’s and Don’ts

By Audra Slinkey, Home Staging Resource

A lot of real estate agents are looking for a good, reliable home stager that can magically transform their listings into the price point their seller is hoping to achieve. The trouble and confusion sometimes comes when the real estate professional asks a few home stagers to “bid” or present a proposal on their vacant home.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Helen Bartlett of Refined Interior Staging Solutions in Kansas City

The vacant staging proposal price can range anywhere from $1,500 to $8,000 for a smaller home, so do you just pick the best priced stager?

I think we can all agree that there is a BIG difference between Walmart and Restoration Hardware when it comes to furnishings, so choosing a home stager on price alone is not a good idea … here’s why.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo Credit: HSR Certified Corrine Kaas of Harmonizing Homes

The professionally certified and trained home stager ranks the home based on “luxury level” and places the most ideal furnishings that kind of buyer would “expect” in the home. In each area across the country, there is a certain buyer “expectation” that corresponds to price point and location.

DO make sure the furnishings enhance and correspond with the buyer expectation for that home.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Donna Dazzo of Designed to Appeal in New York City

It’s not a matter of simply choosing a couch/chair/coffee table/rug to go into the space … it’s an art form. Professional stagers tend to base their price on the VALUE of the furnishings that go into that home. This is how they calculate their return on investment (ROI) and cover their costs, so that their business will be around in a year. This is also how they are able to stay on trend, turn over older furnishings, and present the home in a fresh, modern way every time.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Leia Ward of LTW Design in Connecticut

DON’T choose on price alone.

Going with the lowest priced staging proposal could mean you are getting low priced furnishings, which ultimately could hurt the sale of the home. Here are a couple questions to ask a home stager rather than base your choice on price:

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Glenda Evers of Elite Interiors

DO ask them what kind of “look” can I expect to go in this home?

This is their chance to show and talk you through their expertise and show you their work. If they fumble or choose a style that does not fit the style or luxury level of the home, then I would question their credibility and training.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Jeff Johnson of the Home Staging Pros in Florida

DO ask them if they buy wholesale?

The certified stager knows how to buy wholesale and can get AMAZING prices on luxury furnishings (thus more bang for your buck!) But some home stagers are not certified or trained in this kind of advanced shopping.

I train on this extensively, and here’s an example of the kind of pricing you can get by going to the market. I love the look of layered rugs and this zebra hide rug costs only $99 at the market … what?!

DON’T base your choice on experience alone.

Staging will always be an art form and some of the most talented stagers I’ve seen who do not sacrifice on quality of materials are brand new to the industry. Their heart and soul is placed into that home and it shows. Take a chance and try someone new.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Grad Leslie Anderson of Leslie Anderson Interiors in Virginia

A good rule of thumb is to consider spending a little less or around 1 percent the value of the home on vacant staging in order for the staging to match the luxury level of the home. The million-plus dollar home needs to be staged like a million bucks …. buyers expect this.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Grad Birgit Anich of BA Staging and Interiors in Connecticut

If the seller’s furnishings are over 10 years old then DO have them consider “moving out” beforehand, so that they can make an extra 5 to 10 percent the value of the home in the sale. According to recent staging statistics, the seller who spends close to 1 percent on staging usually sees over a 10 percent return on investment. There does appear to be a connection between spending more and getting more.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Grad Corrine McKendrick of Pacific Home Design

Photo credit: HSR Grad Corrine McKendrick of Pacific Home Design

DO educate the seller on how they can get the best price for their home by staging.

I’m seeing a lot of smart agents educating their sellers on this critical cost, sometimes even paying it up front (for the cash poor seller) and then charging it in closing as part of their fee. We all know that markets go up and down, but the real estate agent who consistently puts the best marketed and priced product on the market for the sellers, is the one that will be around forever.

To find home stagers that do the kind of work featured above, visit Directory of Certified Home Stagers and Designers.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Audra Slinkey is president and founder of the Home Staging Resource, an advanced home staging and redesign certification training company. Slinkey has been awarded the “Most Innovative Product of the Year Award” three times for her training and serves on the board of the Real Estate Staging Association. Slinkey is a published author and international speaker on staging, color, and design. She is proud and privileged to help create and mentor thousands of staging and design businesses across the globe.

      

How to Understand Home Staging Pricing and Proposals: Do’s and Don’ts

By Audra Slinkey, Home Staging Resource

A lot of real estate agents are looking for a good, reliable home stager that can magically transform their listings into the price point their seller is hoping to achieve. The trouble and confusion sometimes comes when the real estate professional asks a few home stagers to “bid” or present a proposal on their vacant home.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Helen Bartlett of Refined Interior Staging Solutions in Kansas City

The vacant staging proposal price can range anywhere from $1,500 to $8,000 for a smaller home, so do you just pick the best priced stager?

I think we can all agree that there is a BIG difference between Walmart and Restoration Hardware when it comes to furnishings, so choosing a home stager on price alone is not a good idea … here’s why.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo Credit: HSR Certified Corrine Kaas of Harmonizing Homes

The professionally certified and trained home stager ranks the home based on “luxury level” and places the most ideal furnishings that kind of buyer would “expect” in the home. In each area across the country, there is a certain buyer “expectation” that corresponds to price point and location.

DO make sure the furnishings enhance and correspond with the buyer expectation for that home.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Donna Dazzo of Designed to Appeal in New York City

It’s not a matter of simply choosing a couch/chair/coffee table/rug to go into the space … it’s an art form. Professional stagers tend to base their price on the VALUE of the furnishings that go into that home. This is how they calculate their return on investment (ROI) and cover their costs, so that their business will be around in a year. This is also how they are able to stay on trend, turn over older furnishings, and present the home in a fresh, modern way every time.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Leia Ward of LTW Design in Connecticut

DON’T choose on price alone.

Going with the lowest priced staging proposal could mean you are getting low priced furnishings, which ultimately could hurt the sale of the home. Here are a couple questions to ask a home stager rather than base your choice on price:

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Glenda Evers of Elite Interiors

DO ask them what kind of “look” can I expect to go in this home?

This is their chance to show and talk you through their expertise and show you their work. If they fumble or choose a style that does not fit the style or luxury level of the home, then I would question their credibility and training.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Jeff Johnson of the Home Staging Pros in Florida

DO ask them if they buy wholesale?

The certified stager knows how to buy wholesale and can get AMAZING prices on luxury furnishings (thus more bang for your buck!) But some home stagers are not certified or trained in this kind of advanced shopping.

I train on this extensively, and here’s an example of the kind of pricing you can get by going to the market. I love the look of layered rugs and this zebra hide rug costs only $99 at the market … what?!

DON’T base your choice on experience alone.

Staging will always be an art form and some of the most talented stagers I’ve seen who do not sacrifice on quality of materials are brand new to the industry. Their heart and soul is placed into that home and it shows. Take a chance and try someone new.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Grad Leslie Anderson of Leslie Anderson Interiors in Virginia

A good rule of thumb is to consider spending a little less or around 1 percent the value of the home on vacant staging in order for the staging to match the luxury level of the home. The million-plus dollar home needs to be staged like a million bucks …. buyers expect this.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Grad Birgit Anich of BA Staging and Interiors in Connecticut

If the seller’s furnishings are over 10 years old then DO have them consider “moving out” beforehand, so that they can make an extra 5 to 10 percent the value of the home in the sale. According to recent staging statistics, the seller who spends close to 1 percent on staging usually sees over a 10 percent return on investment. There does appear to be a connection between spending more and getting more.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Grad Corrine McKendrick of Pacific Home Design

Photo credit: HSR Grad Corrine McKendrick of Pacific Home Design

DO educate the seller on how they can get the best price for their home by staging.

I’m seeing a lot of smart agents educating their sellers on this critical cost, sometimes even paying it up front (for the cash poor seller) and then charging it in closing as part of their fee. We all know that markets go up and down, but the real estate agent who consistently puts the best marketed and priced product on the market for the sellers, is the one that will be around forever.

To find home stagers that do the kind of work featured above, visit Directory of Certified Home Stagers and Designers.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Audra Slinkey is president and founder of the Home Staging Resource, an advanced home staging and redesign certification training company. Slinkey has been awarded the “Most Innovative Product of the Year Award” three times for her training and serves on the board of the Real Estate Staging Association. Slinkey is a published author and international speaker on staging, color, and design. She is proud and privileged to help create and mentor thousands of staging and design businesses across the globe.

      

How to Understand Home Staging Pricing and Proposals: Do’s and Don’ts

By Audra Slinkey, Home Staging Resource

A lot of real estate agents are looking for a good, reliable home stager that can magically transform their listings into the price point their seller is hoping to achieve. The trouble and confusion sometimes comes when the real estate professional asks a few home stagers to “bid” or present a proposal on their vacant home.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Helen Bartlett of Refined Interior Staging Solutions in Kansas City

The vacant staging proposal price can range anywhere from $1,500 to $8,000 for a smaller home, so do you just pick the best priced stager?

I think we can all agree that there is a BIG difference between Walmart and Restoration Hardware when it comes to furnishings, so choosing a home stager on price alone is not a good idea … here’s why.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo Credit: HSR Certified Corrine Kaas of Harmonizing Homes

The professionally certified and trained home stager ranks the home based on “luxury level” and places the most ideal furnishings that kind of buyer would “expect” in the home. In each area across the country, there is a certain buyer “expectation” that corresponds to price point and location.

DO make sure the furnishings enhance and correspond with the buyer expectation for that home.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Donna Dazzo of Designed to Appeal in New York City

It’s not a matter of simply choosing a couch/chair/coffee table/rug to go into the space … it’s an art form. Professional stagers tend to base their price on the VALUE of the furnishings that go into that home. This is how they calculate their return on investment (ROI) and cover their costs, so that their business will be around in a year. This is also how they are able to stay on trend, turn over older furnishings, and present the home in a fresh, modern way every time.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Leia Ward of LTW Design in Connecticut

DON’T choose on price alone.

Going with the lowest priced staging proposal could mean you are getting low priced furnishings, which ultimately could hurt the sale of the home. Here are a couple questions to ask a home stager rather than base your choice on price:

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Glenda Evers of Elite Interiors

DO ask them what kind of “look” can I expect to go in this home?

This is their chance to show and talk you through their expertise and show you their work. If they fumble or choose a style that does not fit the style or luxury level of the home, then I would question their credibility and training.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Certified Jeff Johnson of the Home Staging Pros in Florida

DO ask them if they buy wholesale?

The certified stager knows how to buy wholesale and can get AMAZING prices on luxury furnishings (thus more bang for your buck!) But some home stagers are not certified or trained in this kind of advanced shopping.

I train on this extensively, and here’s an example of the kind of pricing you can get by going to the market. I love the look of layered rugs and this zebra hide rug costs only $99 at the market … what?!

DON’T base your choice on experience alone.

Staging will always be an art form and some of the most talented stagers I’ve seen who do not sacrifice on quality of materials are brand new to the industry. Their heart and soul is placed into that home and it shows. Take a chance and try someone new.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Grad Leslie Anderson of Leslie Anderson Interiors in Virginia

A good rule of thumb is to consider spending a little less or around 1 percent the value of the home on vacant staging in order for the staging to match the luxury level of the home. The million-plus dollar home needs to be staged like a million bucks …. buyers expect this.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Grad Birgit Anich of BA Staging and Interiors in Connecticut

If the seller’s furnishings are over 10 years old then DO have them consider “moving out” beforehand, so that they can make an extra 5 to 10 percent the value of the home in the sale. According to recent staging statistics, the seller who spends close to 1 percent on staging usually sees over a 10 percent return on investment. There does appear to be a connection between spending more and getting more.

BEFORE

AFTER

Photo credit: HSR Grad Corrine McKendrick of Pacific Home Design

Photo credit: HSR Grad Corrine McKendrick of Pacific Home Design

DO educate the seller on how they can get the best price for their home by staging.

I’m seeing a lot of smart agents educating their sellers on this critical cost, sometimes even paying it up front (for the cash poor seller) and then charging it in closing as part of their fee. We all know that markets go up and down, but the real estate agent who consistently puts the best marketed and priced product on the market for the sellers, is the one that will be around forever.

To find home stagers that do the kind of work featured above, visit Directory of Certified Home Stagers and Designers.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Audra Slinkey is president and founder of the Home Staging Resource, an advanced home staging and redesign certification training company. Slinkey has been awarded the “Most Innovative Product of the Year Award” three times for her training and serves on the board of the Real Estate Staging Association. Slinkey is a published author and international speaker on staging, color, and design. She is proud and privileged to help create and mentor thousands of staging and design businesses across the globe.

      

What Property Buyers Should Know About Land Loans

(TNS)—If you’re thinking about buying land, you’ll be hard-pressed to persuade a mortgage lender to finance your purchase. Instead, you’ll likely need to apply for a land loan.

Land loans aren’t as common as mortgage loans, so your options may be limited. Also, because of different factors, you could end up with a shorter repayment period and higher down payment and interest rate than you’d find with a mortgage loan.

So, if you’re considering getting a land loan, it’s important to know what you’re getting yourself into and what options are available to reduce your costs.

What Are Land Loans?
Land loans are a type of credit you can use to buy a vacant lot to eventually build a home on or raw land that you don’t intend to develop.

Land loans tend to be riskier for lenders than mortgage loans, says Casey Fleming, a mortgage adviser with C2 Financial Corp. in San Jose, Calif. Because of that, you may not get as favorable terms as you might get with a mortgage loan.

“Owners of raw land are much more likely to stop making payments and walk away from the property in the event of a financial event in their lives,” Fleming says. “And land is much harder to sell (than a home).”

That’s primarily because the demand for land is smaller than the demand for new and existing homes. So, if a lender needs to foreclose on the land, there’s no guarantee it will get its money back in a timely manner, if at all.

As a result, some lenders require a substantial down payment and charge high interest rates on land loans. Also, some land loans have significantly shorter repayment terms than a typical 15- or 30-year term you might get with a mortgage loan.

5 Land Loans to Consider to Finance Your Land Purchase
There are five common types of land loans you can get to finance your land purchase, each with its own terms and features.

  1. Lender Land Loans
    Community banks and credit unions are more likely to offer land loans than large national banks. Your best bet is to find a lender with a presence near the land you want to buy. Local financial institutions know the area and can better assess the value of the land and its potential.

If you’re leaving the land undeveloped, interest costs will be very high, Fleming says. Plus, a lender could require a down payment as high as 50 percent.

Some lenders, however, may be willing to take a lower down payment and charge lower interest rates if you have plans to build on the land soon. So, shop around before you apply.

Also, local lenders are more likely to offer longer repayment terms, giving you more time to repay the debt.

  1. USDA Rural Housing Site Loans
    If you’re planning on building a primary residence in a rural area, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a couple of loans that can help.

Section 523 loans are designed for borrowers who plan to build their own home, while Section 524 loans allow you to hire a contractor to build the home for you. Both loans are designed for families with low to moderate income, and they have a repayment term of just two years. Interest rates, however, can be low. Section 523 loans, for instance, charge just 3 percent, while Section 524 loans charge the current market rate.

Depending on the situation, you may even qualify for a loan with no down payment.

  1. SBA 504 Loan
    If you’re a business owner planning to use the land for your business, you may qualify for a 504 loan through the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). With a 504 loan, you, the SBA and a lender help contribute to the costs of the land purchase:
  • The SBA provides a loan for 40 percent of the purchase cost.
  • A lender provides a loan for 50 percent of the purchase cost.
  • You contribute 10 percent in the form of a down payment.

SBA loans come with a 10- or 20-year repayment period, and the interest rate will be based on current market rates. The terms of the loan you receive through the lender can vary, however, depending on which lender you choose.

  1. Home Equity Loan
    If you have an existing home with significant equity, it may be worth getting a home equity loan instead of trying to get a land loan. There’s no down payment on a home equity loan. What’s more, you can typically get a low interest rate—regardless of what you plan to do with the land—because your home secures the loan.

The downside is that if you default on the loan, you could lose your home. Also, since you’re not using the loan to buy, build or substantially improve the home used as collateral, you can’t deduct the interest you pay when you file your taxes.

Depending on the lender and the loan, your repayment term could be anywhere between five and 30 years.

  1. Seller Financing
    In some cases, the person or company selling the land may be willing to offer short-term financing. In many cases, the seller isn’t in the lending business and doesn’t have a broad portfolio of loans like a community bank or credit union.

As a result, you can typically expect high interest rates and a high down payment. Also, it’s unlikely you’ll get a long repayment term. So, consider this option if you can’t qualify for any other type of land loan.

How to Find the Right Land Loan for You
There’s no single best land loan out there for everyone, so it’s important to shop around to find the best one for your situation. Before you do anything, Fleming recommends developing a comprehensive plan for what you plan to do with the land. Doing this can help you determine what type of loan is best and how long you want the repayment term to be.

Keep in mind, though, that some lenders may have limits on how much they’re willing to finance. Others, Fleming says, may require a balloon payment, which is a large, one-time payment at the end of the loan term. “So, you may have to have a plan to pay it off before that payment comes due.”

As you consider your different options, make sure you choose one that fits within your budget and helps you achieve your ultimate goal with the land.

©2018 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post What Property Buyers Should Know About Land Loans appeared first on RISMedia.

      

What Property Buyers Should Know About Land Loans

(TNS)—If you’re thinking about buying land, you’ll be hard-pressed to persuade a mortgage lender to finance your purchase. Instead, you’ll likely need to apply for a land loan.

Land loans aren’t as common as mortgage loans, so your options may be limited. Also, because of different factors, you could end up with a shorter repayment period and higher down payment and interest rate than you’d find with a mortgage loan.

So, if you’re considering getting a land loan, it’s important to know what you’re getting yourself into and what options are available to reduce your costs.

What Are Land Loans?
Land loans are a type of credit you can use to buy a vacant lot to eventually build a home on or raw land that you don’t intend to develop.

Land loans tend to be riskier for lenders than mortgage loans, says Casey Fleming, a mortgage adviser with C2 Financial Corp. in San Jose, Calif. Because of that, you may not get as favorable terms as you might get with a mortgage loan.

“Owners of raw land are much more likely to stop making payments and walk away from the property in the event of a financial event in their lives,” Fleming says. “And land is much harder to sell (than a home).”

That’s primarily because the demand for land is smaller than the demand for new and existing homes. So, if a lender needs to foreclose on the land, there’s no guarantee it will get its money back in a timely manner, if at all.

As a result, some lenders require a substantial down payment and charge high interest rates on land loans. Also, some land loans have significantly shorter repayment terms than a typical 15- or 30-year term you might get with a mortgage loan.

5 Land Loans to Consider to Finance Your Land Purchase
There are five common types of land loans you can get to finance your land purchase, each with its own terms and features.

  1. Lender Land Loans
    Community banks and credit unions are more likely to offer land loans than large national banks. Your best bet is to find a lender with a presence near the land you want to buy. Local financial institutions know the area and can better assess the value of the land and its potential.

If you’re leaving the land undeveloped, interest costs will be very high, Fleming says. Plus, a lender could require a down payment as high as 50 percent.

Some lenders, however, may be willing to take a lower down payment and charge lower interest rates if you have plans to build on the land soon. So, shop around before you apply.

Also, local lenders are more likely to offer longer repayment terms, giving you more time to repay the debt.

  1. USDA Rural Housing Site Loans
    If you’re planning on building a primary residence in a rural area, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a couple of loans that can help.

Section 523 loans are designed for borrowers who plan to build their own home, while Section 524 loans allow you to hire a contractor to build the home for you. Both loans are designed for families with low to moderate income, and they have a repayment term of just two years. Interest rates, however, can be low. Section 523 loans, for instance, charge just 3 percent, while Section 524 loans charge the current market rate.

Depending on the situation, you may even qualify for a loan with no down payment.

  1. SBA 504 Loan
    If you’re a business owner planning to use the land for your business, you may qualify for a 504 loan through the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). With a 504 loan, you, the SBA and a lender help contribute to the costs of the land purchase:
  • The SBA provides a loan for 40 percent of the purchase cost.
  • A lender provides a loan for 50 percent of the purchase cost.
  • You contribute 10 percent in the form of a down payment.

SBA loans come with a 10- or 20-year repayment period, and the interest rate will be based on current market rates. The terms of the loan you receive through the lender can vary, however, depending on which lender you choose.

  1. Home Equity Loan
    If you have an existing home with significant equity, it may be worth getting a home equity loan instead of trying to get a land loan. There’s no down payment on a home equity loan. What’s more, you can typically get a low interest rate—regardless of what you plan to do with the land—because your home secures the loan.

The downside is that if you default on the loan, you could lose your home. Also, since you’re not using the loan to buy, build or substantially improve the home used as collateral, you can’t deduct the interest you pay when you file your taxes.

Depending on the lender and the loan, your repayment term could be anywhere between five and 30 years.

  1. Seller Financing
    In some cases, the person or company selling the land may be willing to offer short-term financing. In many cases, the seller isn’t in the lending business and doesn’t have a broad portfolio of loans like a community bank or credit union.

As a result, you can typically expect high interest rates and a high down payment. Also, it’s unlikely you’ll get a long repayment term. So, consider this option if you can’t qualify for any other type of land loan.

How to Find the Right Land Loan for You
There’s no single best land loan out there for everyone, so it’s important to shop around to find the best one for your situation. Before you do anything, Fleming recommends developing a comprehensive plan for what you plan to do with the land. Doing this can help you determine what type of loan is best and how long you want the repayment term to be.

Keep in mind, though, that some lenders may have limits on how much they’re willing to finance. Others, Fleming says, may require a balloon payment, which is a large, one-time payment at the end of the loan term. “So, you may have to have a plan to pay it off before that payment comes due.”

As you consider your different options, make sure you choose one that fits within your budget and helps you achieve your ultimate goal with the land.

©2018 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post What Property Buyers Should Know About Land Loans appeared first on RISMedia.

      

What Property Buyers Should Know About Land Loans

(TNS)—If you’re thinking about buying land, you’ll be hard-pressed to persuade a mortgage lender to finance your purchase. Instead, you’ll likely need to apply for a land loan.

Land loans aren’t as common as mortgage loans, so your options may be limited. Also, because of different factors, you could end up with a shorter repayment period and higher down payment and interest rate than you’d find with a mortgage loan.

So, if you’re considering getting a land loan, it’s important to know what you’re getting yourself into and what options are available to reduce your costs.

What Are Land Loans?
Land loans are a type of credit you can use to buy a vacant lot to eventually build a home on or raw land that you don’t intend to develop.

Land loans tend to be riskier for lenders than mortgage loans, says Casey Fleming, a mortgage adviser with C2 Financial Corp. in San Jose, Calif. Because of that, you may not get as favorable terms as you might get with a mortgage loan.

“Owners of raw land are much more likely to stop making payments and walk away from the property in the event of a financial event in their lives,” Fleming says. “And land is much harder to sell (than a home).”

That’s primarily because the demand for land is smaller than the demand for new and existing homes. So, if a lender needs to foreclose on the land, there’s no guarantee it will get its money back in a timely manner, if at all.

As a result, some lenders require a substantial down payment and charge high interest rates on land loans. Also, some land loans have significantly shorter repayment terms than a typical 15- or 30-year term you might get with a mortgage loan.

5 Land Loans to Consider to Finance Your Land Purchase
There are five common types of land loans you can get to finance your land purchase, each with its own terms and features.

  1. Lender Land Loans
    Community banks and credit unions are more likely to offer land loans than large national banks. Your best bet is to find a lender with a presence near the land you want to buy. Local financial institutions know the area and can better assess the value of the land and its potential.

If you’re leaving the land undeveloped, interest costs will be very high, Fleming says. Plus, a lender could require a down payment as high as 50 percent.

Some lenders, however, may be willing to take a lower down payment and charge lower interest rates if you have plans to build on the land soon. So, shop around before you apply.

Also, local lenders are more likely to offer longer repayment terms, giving you more time to repay the debt.

  1. USDA Rural Housing Site Loans
    If you’re planning on building a primary residence in a rural area, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a couple of loans that can help.

Section 523 loans are designed for borrowers who plan to build their own home, while Section 524 loans allow you to hire a contractor to build the home for you. Both loans are designed for families with low to moderate income, and they have a repayment term of just two years. Interest rates, however, can be low. Section 523 loans, for instance, charge just 3 percent, while Section 524 loans charge the current market rate.

Depending on the situation, you may even qualify for a loan with no down payment.

  1. SBA 504 Loan
    If you’re a business owner planning to use the land for your business, you may qualify for a 504 loan through the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). With a 504 loan, you, the SBA and a lender help contribute to the costs of the land purchase:
  • The SBA provides a loan for 40 percent of the purchase cost.
  • A lender provides a loan for 50 percent of the purchase cost.
  • You contribute 10 percent in the form of a down payment.

SBA loans come with a 10- or 20-year repayment period, and the interest rate will be based on current market rates. The terms of the loan you receive through the lender can vary, however, depending on which lender you choose.

  1. Home Equity Loan
    If you have an existing home with significant equity, it may be worth getting a home equity loan instead of trying to get a land loan. There’s no down payment on a home equity loan. What’s more, you can typically get a low interest rate—regardless of what you plan to do with the land—because your home secures the loan.

The downside is that if you default on the loan, you could lose your home. Also, since you’re not using the loan to buy, build or substantially improve the home used as collateral, you can’t deduct the interest you pay when you file your taxes.

Depending on the lender and the loan, your repayment term could be anywhere between five and 30 years.

  1. Seller Financing
    In some cases, the person or company selling the land may be willing to offer short-term financing. In many cases, the seller isn’t in the lending business and doesn’t have a broad portfolio of loans like a community bank or credit union.

As a result, you can typically expect high interest rates and a high down payment. Also, it’s unlikely you’ll get a long repayment term. So, consider this option if you can’t qualify for any other type of land loan.

How to Find the Right Land Loan for You
There’s no single best land loan out there for everyone, so it’s important to shop around to find the best one for your situation. Before you do anything, Fleming recommends developing a comprehensive plan for what you plan to do with the land. Doing this can help you determine what type of loan is best and how long you want the repayment term to be.

Keep in mind, though, that some lenders may have limits on how much they’re willing to finance. Others, Fleming says, may require a balloon payment, which is a large, one-time payment at the end of the loan term. “So, you may have to have a plan to pay it off before that payment comes due.”

As you consider your different options, make sure you choose one that fits within your budget and helps you achieve your ultimate goal with the land.

©2018 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post What Property Buyers Should Know About Land Loans appeared first on RISMedia.

      

$199,000 :: 46608 SNOWBIRD, Update MI, 48044

4 beds, 3 baths
Home size: 2,400 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/09/18, Last Updated: 09/09/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 662039
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: BRECKENRIDGE VILLAGE
Status: Sold

Bargain Price!!! 2400 sqft Split Level, UticaSchools, 1st flr Master Suite, Oak Kitchen, 1stflr Laundry, Den, Loft, Skylights, SecuritySystem, Sprinkling System, 2.5 Baths, Bridge,Brick Paver Patio, prof landscape, imm occupancy

Listed with RE/MAX Suburban, Inc.


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

$199,000 :: 46608 SNOWBIRD, Update MI, 48044

4 beds, 3 baths
Home size: 2,400 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/09/18, Last Updated: 09/09/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 662039
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: BRECKENRIDGE VILLAGE
Status: Sold

Bargain Price!!! 2400 sqft Split Level, UticaSchools, 1st flr Master Suite, Oak Kitchen, 1stflr Laundry, Den, Loft, Skylights, SecuritySystem, Sprinkling System, 2.5 Baths, Bridge,Brick Paver Patio, prof landscape, imm occupancy

Listed with RE/MAX Suburban, Inc.


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

$199,000 :: 46608 SNOWBIRD, Update MI, 48044

4 beds, 3 baths
Home size: 2,400 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/09/18, Last Updated: 09/09/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 662039
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: BRECKENRIDGE VILLAGE
Status: Sold

Bargain Price!!! 2400 sqft Split Level, UticaSchools, 1st flr Master Suite, Oak Kitchen, 1stflr Laundry, Den, Loft, Skylights, SecuritySystem, Sprinkling System, 2.5 Baths, Bridge,Brick Paver Patio, prof landscape, imm occupancy

Listed with RE/MAX Suburban, Inc.


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

$234,900 :: 52204 Southview Ridge, Macomb MI, 48042

Property Photo

2 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,594 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/08/18, Last Updated: 09/08/18
Property Type: Condo/Townhouse/Co-Op
MLS Number: 31359326
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: Cobblestone Ridge III
Status: Active

This is a rare find! The cleanest END UNIT condo you will find! Large Great Room w/ Cathedral Ceilings & Gas Fireplace. Kitchen w/ LaFata Cabinets that are like new. Newer Appliances. Breakfast nook & formal dining room. Beautiful natural oak hardwood floors throughout much of home. Newer Carpet. Master Suite w/ walk in closet & additional 2nd closet. Full Bathroom w/ deep Jacuzzi tub & stand up shower. 2nd BR w/ large closet & door wall that leads to deck. Large Windows let lots of natural light in! Additional Paver Patio that is very secluded by tall arborvitaes. First Floor Laundry room w/ 2 closets. Basement is wide open & clean. Work Room in Basement. New Furnace & Central Air in 2016. Updated Electrical. Sump pump maintained by association. Additional water pressured back up sump pump as well. Roof is about 4 years old. STUNNING Garage w/ epoxy covered cement. May be immediate occupancy! Nothing to do but move in!

Listed with RE/MAX First


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

$234,900 :: 52204 Southview Ridge, Macomb MI, 48042

Property Photo

2 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,594 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/08/18, Last Updated: 09/08/18
Property Type: Condo/Townhouse/Co-Op
MLS Number: 31359326
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: Cobblestone Ridge III
Status: Active

This is a rare find! The cleanest END UNIT condo you will find! Large Great Room w/ Cathedral Ceilings & Gas Fireplace. Kitchen w/ LaFata Cabinets that are like new. Newer Appliances. Breakfast nook & formal dining room. Beautiful natural oak hardwood floors throughout much of home. Newer Carpet. Master Suite w/ walk in closet & additional 2nd closet. Full Bathroom w/ deep Jacuzzi tub & stand up shower. 2nd BR w/ large closet & door wall that leads to deck. Large Windows let lots of natural light in! Additional Paver Patio that is very secluded by tall arborvitaes. First Floor Laundry room w/ 2 closets. Basement is wide open & clean. Work Room in Basement. New Furnace & Central Air in 2016. Updated Electrical. Sump pump maintained by association. Additional water pressured back up sump pump as well. Roof is about 4 years old. STUNNING Garage w/ epoxy covered cement. May be immediate occupancy! Nothing to do but move in!

Listed with RE/MAX First


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

$234,900 :: 52204 Southview Ridge, Macomb MI, 48042

Property Photo

2 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,594 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 09/08/18, Last Updated: 09/08/18
Property Type: Condo/Townhouse/Co-Op
MLS Number: 31359326
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: Cobblestone Ridge III
Status: Active

This is a rare find! The cleanest END UNIT condo you will find! Large Great Room w/ Cathedral Ceilings & Gas Fireplace. Kitchen w/ LaFata Cabinets that are like new. Newer Appliances. Breakfast nook & formal dining room. Beautiful natural oak hardwood floors throughout much of home. Newer Carpet. Master Suite w/ walk in closet & additional 2nd closet. Full Bathroom w/ deep Jacuzzi tub & stand up shower. 2nd BR w/ large closet & door wall that leads to deck. Large Windows let lots of natural light in! Additional Paver Patio that is very secluded by tall arborvitaes. First Floor Laundry room w/ 2 closets. Basement is wide open & clean. Work Room in Basement. New Furnace & Central Air in 2016. Updated Electrical. Sump pump maintained by association. Additional water pressured back up sump pump as well. Roof is about 4 years old. STUNNING Garage w/ epoxy covered cement. May be immediate occupancy! Nothing to do but move in!

Listed with RE/MAX First


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

Consumer Confidence at High Point

In August, consumer confidence rose, posting a 133.4 reading in the Consumer Confidence Index® from The Conference Board. July’s reading was 127.9.

The Expectations reading of the Index, which gauges how consumers feel about their business, employment and income prospects six months out, improved, as well, to 107.6, while the Present Situation reading, which gauges how consumers feel about conditions currently, rose to 172.2.

“Consumer confidence increased to its highest level since October 2000 following a modest improvement in July,” said Lynn Franco, director of Economic Indicators at The Conference Board, in a statement. “Consumers’ assessment of current business and labor market conditions improved further. Expectations, which had declined in June and July, bounced back in August and continue to suggest solid economic growth for the remainder of 2018. Overall, these historically high confidence levels should continue to support healthy consumer spending in the near-term.”

Source: The Conference Board

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Consumer Confidence at High Point appeared first on RISMedia.

      

Consumer Confidence at High Point

In August, consumer confidence rose, posting a 133.4 reading in the Consumer Confidence Index® from The Conference Board. July’s reading was 127.9.

The Expectations reading of the Index, which gauges how consumers feel about their business, employment and income prospects six months out, improved, as well, to 107.6, while the Present Situation reading, which gauges how consumers feel about conditions currently, rose to 172.2.

“Consumer confidence increased to its highest level since October 2000 following a modest improvement in July,” said Lynn Franco, director of Economic Indicators at The Conference Board, in a statement. “Consumers’ assessment of current business and labor market conditions improved further. Expectations, which had declined in June and July, bounced back in August and continue to suggest solid economic growth for the remainder of 2018. Overall, these historically high confidence levels should continue to support healthy consumer spending in the near-term.”

Source: The Conference Board

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Consumer Confidence at High Point appeared first on RISMedia.

      

Consumer Confidence at High Point

In August, consumer confidence rose, posting a 133.4 reading in the Consumer Confidence Index® from The Conference Board. July’s reading was 127.9.

The Expectations reading of the Index, which gauges how consumers feel about their business, employment and income prospects six months out, improved, as well, to 107.6, while the Present Situation reading, which gauges how consumers feel about conditions currently, rose to 172.2.

“Consumer confidence increased to its highest level since October 2000 following a modest improvement in July,” said Lynn Franco, director of Economic Indicators at The Conference Board, in a statement. “Consumers’ assessment of current business and labor market conditions improved further. Expectations, which had declined in June and July, bounced back in August and continue to suggest solid economic growth for the remainder of 2018. Overall, these historically high confidence levels should continue to support healthy consumer spending in the near-term.”

Source: The Conference Board

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Consumer Confidence at High Point appeared first on RISMedia.

      

Dorm Room Decor You’ll Want In Your Grown Up Home

Who says small-space storage hacks, quirky decor and multipurpose furniture is only for college kids? Right now, back-to      

Dorm Room Decor You’ll Want In Your Grown Up Home

Who says small-space storage hacks, quirky decor and multipurpose furniture is only for college kids? Right now, back-to      

Dorm Room Decor You’ll Want In Your Grown Up Home

Who says small-space storage hacks, quirky decor and multipurpose furniture is only for college kids? Right now, back-to      

$329,900 :: 55608 Frost, Macomb MI, 48042

Property Photo

3 beds, 3 baths
Home size: 2,040 sq ft
Lot Size: 8,712 sq ft
Added: 09/06/18, Last Updated: 09/06/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 31359152
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: Fallbrooke Farms Sub
Status: Active

Beautiful ranch home for sale in Macomb!!!! This home is only 5 years old and is ready for your family. Over 2000 sqft, wood flooring, granite counters, huge kitchen with stainless steel appliances, and a gorgeous master bath with walk in closet. The lot backs up to woods which gives your family a little more privacy as you sit and enjoy your stamped concrete patio. Make your appointment today to see this home!!!

Listed with Esoteric Realty LLC


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

$329,900 :: 55608 Frost, Macomb MI, 48042

Property Photo

3 beds, 3 baths
Home size: 2,040 sq ft
Lot Size: 8,712 sq ft
Added: 09/06/18, Last Updated: 09/06/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 31359152
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: Fallbrooke Farms Sub
Status: Active

Beautiful ranch home for sale in Macomb!!!! This home is only 5 years old and is ready for your family. Over 2000 sqft, wood flooring, granite counters, huge kitchen with stainless steel appliances, and a gorgeous master bath with walk in closet. The lot backs up to woods which gives your family a little more privacy as you sit and enjoy your stamped concrete patio. Make your appointment today to see this home!!!

Listed with Esoteric Realty LLC


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


      

$329,900 :: 55608 Frost, Macomb MI, 48042

Property Photo

3 beds, 3 baths
Home size: 2,040 sq ft
Lot Size: 8,712 sq ft
Added: 09/06/18, Last Updated: 09/06/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 31359152
Community: Macomb Twp (50008)
Tract: Fallbrooke Farms Sub
Status: Active

Beautiful ranch home for sale in Macomb!!!! This home is only 5 years old and is ready for your family. Over 2000 sqft, wood flooring, granite counters, huge kitchen with stainless steel appliances, and a gorgeous master bath with walk in closet. The lot backs up to woods which gives your family a little more privacy as you sit and enjoy your stamped concrete patio. Make your appointment today to see this home!!!

Listed with Esoteric Realty LLC


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!